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morningamp:

A grand don’t come for free, but if you can leave the country and get back and spend around that, it’s a pretty good deal. Where to? Well, our travel-sized travel guide Sarahlynn Pablo joined the AMp hosts Brian Babylon and Molly Adams this morning as she picked out some prime destinations for us, gave a lot of advice for finding cheap airfare and told us whether those vacation packages are really worth it. If you are interested in checking out Sarahlynn’s research on everything from international fares and best values to basic and smart traveling information, visit her blog!

Hey that’s me voice!

(via teamvocalo)

I won’t tell you how to help Philippines Typhoon Haiyan Yolanda survivors.I believe every charitable giving situation, and especially with this natural disaster, is a…View Post

I won’t tell you how to help Philippines Typhoon Haiyan Yolanda survivors.

I believe every charitable giving situation, and especially with this natural disaster, is a…

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lovepeaceandjellybeans:

Happening now at Rizal Center… I am overwhelmed with gratitude and love :) #yolandaph #bayanihan #pinoy #pride #love

Filipinos and those who love us volunteering to donate and pack/sort donated goods to relief efforts back home. CRYING.

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NextDayBetter: Creative and Tech Ways to Support Typhoon Haiyan | #YolandaPH Relief Efforts

nextdaybetter:

image

Below are creative ways you can help relief efforts for Typhoon Haiyan/YolandaPH as a digital humanitarian.

  1. Bangon Philippines Learn about the needs of each affected area with this information crowdsourcing tool so that you can make informed decision regarding your giving.
  2. Disaster…

We Want Mo’ Momos! A Diwali celebration with Nepali street food

“Any other food today is going to be such a disappointment.” – co-worker after eating Gita’s Momo Kitchen sample.

Last week, friend Ravi Grover messaged me on Facebook about the new catering business he and his wife Gita started, and did I want to try…

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Sea grapes, seaweed, green caviar - ar-arosep! [sponsored]

Sea grapes, seaweed, green caviar - ar-arosep! #filipino #food

‘Susmariosep, naimas ti ar-arosep!!

Jesusmaryjoseph, sea grapes are delicious!!

Hey – it rhymes in Ilocano.

My mom particularly likes to eat this seaweed. I realize, as I write this, I get my love of food from her.

What are sea grapes? Arosep, sea grapes, green caviar, Philippines

Arosep, sea…

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What Lea Salonga Thinks of Don’t Buy Miss Saigon #missedsaigon #asianamericaView Post

What Lea Salonga Thinks of Don’t Buy Miss Saigon #missedsaigon #asianamerica

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This is Samantha Irby. Reading her blog made me believe again that writing has real power. Do yourself a favor and read bitchesgottaeat.com. All the posts. Then order yourself a copy of MEATY. You will thank me.  (at The Silver Room)

This is Samantha Irby. Reading her blog made me believe again that writing has real power. Do yourself a favor and read bitchesgottaeat.com. All the posts. Then order yourself a copy of MEATY. You will thank me. (at The Silver Room)

Rizal Shrine day trip: Consul General Lim takes us to school on Philippines History [sponsored]

Manila, July 10.

Sixteen buses carrying five hundred delegates were in the convoy. Ten buses were to go to Calamba, the boyhood home and shrine to Dr. Jose Rizal, and six were traveling to Kawit. Kawit is the hometown of General Emilio Aguinaldoand…

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Should (Street) Art Last Forever? Graffiti and the Tour Paris 13 project, October 1 - 31, 2013

Should (Street) Art Last Forever? Graffiti and the Tour Paris 13 project, October 1 - 31, 2013 ONLY

October 6, Dublin.

On a night photography walk with Dusk2Dawn Tours, we approached the former studio of U2, Windmill Lane.

Said Chris of Amateur Traveler, “The rule of tagging, we learned, is that you’re not supposed to put your tag over someone else’s,…

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Rediscovering Filipino History, Manila’s Museums [sponsored]

Author’s Note: This is a much #laterpost, to borrow Twitter parlance, but hey — it’s October and week three of Filipino American History Month. Officially. To me, it’s always Fil Am History Month. To check out the many events in the city and suburbs,…

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Foodies Fleeced! More to the Crab & Craft Beer ScamEarlier this week I was happy to again join The Morning Ampwith Molly Adams and Ernest Wilkins,…View Post

Foodies Fleeced! More to the Crab & Craft Beer Scam

Earlier this week I was happy to again join The Morning Ampwith Molly Adams and Ernest Wilkins,…

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"Paris is always a good idea." - Audrey Hepburn #travel  (at Montmartre)

"Paris is always a good idea." - Audrey Hepburn #travel (at Montmartre)

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The guy’s a genius. Roy Lichtenstein is much more than comic strips. Most of these works - first complete retrospective in France - were private collection, I noticed. #art (at Exposition Roy Lichtenstein)

The guy’s a genius. Roy Lichtenstein is much more than comic strips. Most of these works - first complete retrospective in France - were private collection, I noticed. #art (at Exposition Roy Lichtenstein)

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iwriteasiwrite:

The painting is "Gallery of the Louvre" by Samuel Morse; an American scientist and artist most commonly known for inventing the telegraph and Morse code. He began work on the canvas in 1831, while in Paris. The painting itself becomes a jumping off point into David McCullough’s latest work, the story of the American colony in Paris. As McCullough aptly points out, the Morse’s painting was created to bring ‘culture’ to the neophyte American nation:

"There were no museums here, as yet, in the 1830s, and no color representations of paintings," McCullough tells NPR’s Susan Stamberg. "So he was going to bring the culture of Europe — mainly the Renaissance Italian masterpieces in the Louvre collection — back to the United States for the benefit of his countrymen."

Morse was offering his countrymen a glimpse into the rarified air of Parisian art.
The painting, while fascinating in and of itself, is just part of the story of the American colony in Paris. The importance of France in the early formative years of the United States is little remarked. It’s a role that Filipinos, later in the 19th century, hoped that the United States would take on for the then fledgling Philippine Republic. We know how that turned out.
The story here is less about dredging up that old history, but to remark on the importance that Paris played in the formation of the Filipino nation. Like Morse and other Americans, many Filipinos spent years in Paris in exile. They were part in parcel with the Propaganda Movement that manifested itself in Europe in the late 19th century. Importantly, the Filipinos there were caught up in the explosion of ideas and philosophies taking place throughout Paris (and Europe at large) in the fin de siecle; even prior.
What we know of that time, those decades where Paris figured prominently in the Filipino diaspora, is the Juan Luna scandal. Where the most decorated of Filipino artists murdered his wife, mother-in-law and wounded others in a fit of anger. He was set free, true. But what is little remarked is why he was set free. What we say is that there was an unwritten, but accepted rule, that cuckolded men could kill their wives. However, the French also saw Luna as a savage; it was expected of someone from his racial background to act in such a reprehensible manner.
The Luna Scandal resonates somewhat in modern times. But what of the rest? What of Felix Roxas, Agoncillo, Pardo de Tavera, Antonio Luna, Jose Rizal and so many more? What of their experiences in the City of Lights? How were they subtly (and not so subtly) influenced by the panoply of experiences and ideas during their travels in Europe?
What culture and ideas did they transmit, did they bring back, to the Philippines?
Because the fact is that Filipinos abroad, and by extension Filipinos here, were influenced by the new philosophies floating around Europe. As much as they were rebelling against the old ways of thinking that were still extant. Obviously, on the political front, Republicanism in Spain highly influenced early political traditions of the reformists. On the other hand, from all of the published propaganda and social agitations, how did Filipino thinkers influence European public discourse? Much like with Mexico at the beginning of the 19th century, we continually overlook our influence on events abroad. Influence and exchange is a two-way street. And at the time, the Philippines figured somewhat prominently in European (especially Spanish) affairs.
The richness and importance of the Philippine diaspora tradition is frequently overlooked and remains understudied in our historiography. Again, if certain historians are to be believed, it was as if the Philippine Revolution and Republic sprang up spontaneously; just developed randomly. That is a conceit that remains wholly untrue. Initial work by historians like Schumacher and even Ben Anderson prove otherwise. The key is furthering that work and research to truly understand our influences and place in global affairs at the end of the 19th century.
What glimpses into new ideas and culture did our countrymen in Europe offer their brethren back home? How did that make us who we were, who we are today? It is a magnificent, complex and important story that remains yet untold.

iwriteasiwrite:

The painting is "Gallery of the Louvre" by Samuel Morse; an American scientist and artist most commonly known for inventing the telegraph and Morse code. He began work on the canvas in 1831, while in Paris. The painting itself becomes a jumping off point into David McCullough’s latest work, the story of the American colony in Paris. As McCullough aptly points out, the Morse’s painting was created to bring ‘culture’ to the neophyte American nation:

"There were no museums here, as yet, in the 1830s, and no color representations of paintings," McCullough tells NPR’s Susan Stamberg. "So he was going to bring the culture of Europe — mainly the Renaissance Italian masterpieces in the Louvre collection — back to the United States for the benefit of his countrymen."

Morse was offering his countrymen a glimpse into the rarified air of Parisian art.

The painting, while fascinating in and of itself, is just part of the story of the American colony in Paris. The importance of France in the early formative years of the United States is little remarked. It’s a role that Filipinos, later in the 19th century, hoped that the United States would take on for the then fledgling Philippine Republic. We know how that turned out.

The story here is less about dredging up that old history, but to remark on the importance that Paris played in the formation of the Filipino nation. Like Morse and other Americans, many Filipinos spent years in Paris in exile. They were part in parcel with the Propaganda Movement that manifested itself in Europe in the late 19th century. Importantly, the Filipinos there were caught up in the explosion of ideas and philosophies taking place throughout Paris (and Europe at large) in the fin de siecle; even prior.

What we know of that time, those decades where Paris figured prominently in the Filipino diaspora, is the Juan Luna scandal. Where the most decorated of Filipino artists murdered his wife, mother-in-law and wounded others in a fit of anger. He was set free, true. But what is little remarked is why he was set free. What we say is that there was an unwritten, but accepted rule, that cuckolded men could kill their wives. However, the French also saw Luna as a savage; it was expected of someone from his racial background to act in such a reprehensible manner.

The Luna Scandal resonates somewhat in modern times. But what of the rest? What of Felix Roxas, Agoncillo, Pardo de Tavera, Antonio Luna, Jose Rizal and so many more? What of their experiences in the City of Lights? How were they subtly (and not so subtly) influenced by the panoply of experiences and ideas during their travels in Europe?

What culture and ideas did they transmit, did they bring back, to the Philippines?

Because the fact is that Filipinos abroad, and by extension Filipinos here, were influenced by the new philosophies floating around Europe. As much as they were rebelling against the old ways of thinking that were still extant. Obviously, on the political front, Republicanism in Spain highly influenced early political traditions of the reformists. On the other hand, from all of the published propaganda and social agitations, how did Filipino thinkers influence European public discourse? Much like with Mexico at the beginning of the 19th century, we continually overlook our influence on events abroad. Influence and exchange is a two-way street. And at the time, the Philippines figured somewhat prominently in European (especially Spanish) affairs.

The richness and importance of the Philippine diaspora tradition is frequently overlooked and remains understudied in our historiography. Again, if certain historians are to be believed, it was as if the Philippine Revolution and Republic sprang up spontaneously; just developed randomly. That is a conceit that remains wholly untrue. Initial work by historians like Schumacher and even Ben Anderson prove otherwise. The key is furthering that work and research to truly understand our influences and place in global affairs at the end of the 19th century.

What glimpses into new ideas and culture did our countrymen in Europe offer their brethren back home? How did that make us who we were, who we are today? It is a magnificent, complex and important story that remains yet untold.